Poetry

Poetry and Regret: Louise Glück’s ‘Myth of Innocence’

In honor of Louise Glück’s birthday (April 22), I want to share one of my favorite poems of her’s: “The Myth of Innocence”. This poem comes from Averno, a collection of Glück’s works based on the idea of “Avernus”, the place that the ancient Romans believed held the entrance to the underworld. In addition to the video above,… Continue reading Poetry and Regret: Louise Glück’s ‘Myth of Innocence’

Poetry

Poetry Sunday: Reina Maria Rodriguez’s ‘First Time’

i brushed the shells with my fingertips, they were smooth and delicate, but obviously artificial, made to be used once and thrown away. at first touch they might seem real, pearly, perfect, but they’re actually plastic, and they’ve never even seen any sea. So ends Reina Maria Rodriguez’s poem “First Time” (in the video above and… Continue reading Poetry Sunday: Reina Maria Rodriguez’s ‘First Time’

Poetry

Poetry Sunday: Marge Piercy’s ‘A Work of Artifice’

Sometimes writing touches on the more suffocating aspects of life. Marge Piercy’s “A Work of Artifice” captures that tension between care and captivity perfectly. American poet and writer Marge Piercy (1936-) grew up and came of age in the Midwest. She first began publishing her poems in the 1960’s, and much of her writing reflects the… Continue reading Poetry Sunday: Marge Piercy’s ‘A Work of Artifice’

Poetry · writing

Writing Contest: The Missouri Review’s $1000 Miller Audio Prize

I’ve found another great contest for writers; The Missouri Review is now holding its annual Miller Audio Prize. This contest is a little different than some of the others that I’ve shared. As the name indicates, entries must involve an audio element. Participants may submit a piece of poetry, prose, humorous writing, or audio documentary with… Continue reading Writing Contest: The Missouri Review’s $1000 Miller Audio Prize

Poetry

Poetry Sunday: Gabriela Mistral’s ‘The Lark’

Humanity frees as much as it fetters us, something poet Gabriela Mistral knew all to well. Gabriela Mistral (1889-1957) was born Lucila Godoy y Alcayaga in Chile. At age 15 she began working as a teacher’s aide and that same year she began publishing her first poems in a local newspaper. Her emergence as a… Continue reading Poetry Sunday: Gabriela Mistral’s ‘The Lark’

Poetry

Poetry Sunday: Anna Swir’s ‘The Same Inside’

Sometimes we find kinship in unexpected places. Poet Anna Swir’s poem “The Same Inside” captures the meeting of twin souls perfectly. Anna Swir (or Anna Świrszczyńska)(1909-1984) was a Polish poet who wrote about WWII, love, and the experience of women in post-war Europe. When Nazis occupied Poland, she joined the resistance movement, serving as a military… Continue reading Poetry Sunday: Anna Swir’s ‘The Same Inside’

Poetry

Poetry Sunday: Marianne Moore’s ‘Roses Only’

Sometimes the greatest thing about a person isn’t her beauty and grace. It isn’t her sweetness and softness. Sometimes a person’s strength is in the parts of her that are the sharpest. In her poem “Roses Only”, Marianne Moore captures that idea perfectly. Marianne Moore (1887-1972) was an American poet who explored the human experience… Continue reading Poetry Sunday: Marianne Moore’s ‘Roses Only’

Poetry

Poetry Sunday: Vesna Parun’s ‘You Whose Hands Are More Innocent Than Mine’

  Love stories do not always have a happy ending. With its yearning, pain, and affection, Vesna Parun’s poem ‘You Whose Hands Are More Innocent Than Mine’ highlights the ways that old loves can haunt us even after one or more of the parties has moved on from the relationship. Vesna Parun (1922-2010) was a… Continue reading Poetry Sunday: Vesna Parun’s ‘You Whose Hands Are More Innocent Than Mine’

Poetry

Poetry Sunday: Wislawa Szymborska’s ‘The Joy of Writing’

Writers often rise from the ashes of wars. Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska’s (1923-2012) works exemplify how conflict and its aftermath can influence writing. When WWII came to Poland in 1939, Szymborska became part of the underground education circles. Under German occupation, all universities were closed, and education in the Polish language was punishable by death. In order… Continue reading Poetry Sunday: Wislawa Szymborska’s ‘The Joy of Writing’

Poetry

Poetry Sunday: Gwendolyn Brooks’s ‘To Be in Love’

Though Pulitzer Prize winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000) is best known for her verses that describe city life and the experience of coming into womanhood in the predominately African-American neighborhood of Bronzeville, Chicago, ‘To Be in Love’ diverges somewhat from these themes. In addition to the above video, you can find the full text of the… Continue reading Poetry Sunday: Gwendolyn Brooks’s ‘To Be in Love’